We had the good fortune of connecting with Abby Farr and we’ve shared our conversation below.

Hi Abby, do you have some perspective or insight you can share with us on the question of when someone should give up versus when they should keep going?
SD Voyager Interview How to know whether to keep going or give up? Spending a year to research this business idea, creating a business plan, and then launching a Kickstarter campaign to get it off the ground was as intense as it was invigorating. I’m so thankful to say, 5 years later, we are still open for business. Between then and now, I never could have anticipated the challenges and changes we’d encounter. What kept us going is remaining mission-minded, even when the going got tough. I’ll admit, that’s easy to do when the cause we’ve chosen to align with, fighting human trafficking, is so embedded into my heart. When keeping our business afloat through selling pants and generating ideas and plans to expand impacts marginalized women, their freedom and recovery; envisioning their faces shifting from blank stares to joyful smiles, propels us forward. And when we do hit lulls from pandemics or just the nature of certain seasons, we’ve learned the importance of listening to and acknowledging these shifts. We are still learning the wonderful practice of exercising self-compassion. When inspirations is low, we seek the great outdoors to surf, hike, or kayak. We surround ourselves with friends and fellow entrepreneurs who support us and make us laugh. Inevitably, we return inspired and recharged. We set goals and make plans around them. But we try to hold those plans with a loose grip. That way, when unexpected events bubble up, we can shift and pivot smoothly. As 2021 is in sight, we want to work in “ones,”—one day, one meeting, one campaign, and give each event and individual our all. We learn from each of these and from our invaluable support team; revise; but we don’t give up.

Can you give our readers an introduction to your business? Maybe you can share a bit about what you do and what sets you apart from others?
Tillage Clothing Co. is a sustainable fashion brand that gives back to organizations fighting human trafficking. We have begun with the most comfortable, wicking material, with a versatile design, a button ankle embellishment for an feminine touch, and beautiful color choices. Sourcing sustainably does take extra research and costs a little more on the front end. But we think it’s so worth it to help set free victims of trafficking while also reducing our carbon footprint. Offering conscious shoppers highest quality pants while educating those who’d love to know more about how to shop this way is a joy. Sharing that it’s worth paying couple of extra dollars for fashion that lasts, is worth the lives saved from slave labor in the manufacturing process. We want the world to know we are just getting started and to follow our story as we grow. We want the consumer to ask “who made my clothes?” How to know whether to keep going or give up? Spending a year researching this business idea, creating a business plan, and then launching a Kickstarter campaign to get it off the ground was as intense as it was invigorating. I’m so thankful to say, 5 years later, we are still open for business. Between then and now, I never could have anticipated the challenges and changes we’d encounter. What kept us going is remaining mission-minded, even when the going got tough. I’ll admit, that’s easy to do when the cause we’ve chosen to align with, fighting human trafficking, is so embedded into my heart. When keeping our business afloat through selling pants and generating ideas and plans to expand impacts marginalized women, their freedom and recovery; envisioning their faces shifting from blank stares to joyful smiles, propels us forward. And when we do hit lulls from pandemics or just the nature of certain seasons, we’ve learned the importance of listening to and acknowledging these shifts. We are still learning the wonderful practice of exercising self-compassion. When inspirations is low, we seek the great outdoors to surf, hike, or kayak. We surround ourselves with friends and fellow entrepreneurs who support us and make us laugh. Inevitably, we return inspired and recharged. We set goals and make plans around them. But we try to hold those plans with a loose grip. That way, when unexpected events bubble up, we can shift and pivot smoothly. As 2021 is in sight, we want to work in “ones,”—one day, one meeting, one campaign, and give each event and individual our all. We learn from each of these and from our invaluable support team; revise; but we don’t give up.

Let’s say your best friend was visiting the area and you wanted to show them the best time ever. Where would you take them? Give us a little itinerary – say it was a week long trip, where would you eat, drink, visit, hang out, etc.
Encinitas is where it all began, so that would be our first stop. I’d take them to Moonlight Beach, where I’d teach them to surf at Beacons. We’d grab brunch at Honey’s then shop in Solana Beach for a bit. We’d grab wine at Carruth Cellars. Other must visits for food and drink would be La Papagayo, Priority Public House, Fish 101, Encinitas Fish Shop, Regal Seagull, Culture Brewing Co., an evening cocktail at the Roxy.. We’d have to head South for a day or two as well, so I could take them sailing from the Harbor. The San Diego is a must, as an animal lover. It’s the best I’ve ever visited. Going to the Belly Up in Solana Beach is another must to catch some live music at my favorite venue. We would try surfing again in Cardiff-by-the-Sea. Ironsmith Coffee would likely be a daily routine. Part of the fun of the San Diego lifestyle is winging it, so we’d see where the wind took as and what the vibes are like each day for more ideas that best suit each visitor.

Who else deserves some credit and recognition?
I’ve been so fortunate to have imprints of so many lives in the formation and implementation of Tillage, where do I begin? Roommates along the way, from Shyra Joy to Kerry Machaugh, who let our front door hang wide open or let it be revolving as the sewing machine sat posted on our dining room table and patterns sprawled across the floor, trying to create the first pant design. Ethan Wayne challenged me to make the first pair, never realizing I had bigger visions in mind. Aaron Uher helps load and unload, store and jack of all tradesman from the beginning. Todd helped set up the budget and financials. jill bought every color of the first production run. And too many to name helped launch Tillage. Hopefully I’ve given them proper credit and love along the way. Today, as we roll into year five and six, Erica Williams and Kathryn Cradduck are a super force, along with Robin Lefevre. I’ve gotten legal direction from Travis, Larissa and Ellen. Talented photography and look book help from Rob Batorski, James Phenicie, Lauren Milner, Marcel Fuentes, Brian Gurton, and Whitney Renee. I am so grateful for my beautiful friends who graciously model in each photoshoot. Plus, there are so many small businesses I’ve gotten to collaborate with, be inspired and encouraged by. Last but so importantly, my family who has shown support since day one to now, and I know will continue to. The faith others put in me, my dreams, and chasing them is priceless.

Website: www.tillageclothing.com
Instagram: @tillageclothing
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/abby-farr/
Facebook: www.facebook.com/tillageclothing

Image Credits
Marcel Fuentez, James Phoenice, Lauren Milner, Larissa Bodniowycz, Chris Stines

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